Elements of Mineralogy

Elements of Mineralogy


Yazar Frank Rutley
Yayınevi Kluwer Academic Publishers
ISBN 9780045490103
Baskı yılı 1988
Sayfa sayısı 496
Stok durumu Tükendi   

This standard book on minerals, first published in 1882, has been completely revised and updated for the first time in 20 years. Silicate minerals are now described in a separate chapter, using crystal-chemical sub-divisions. Non-silicates are treated under the Dana system of classification. The existing classification, based on principal economic elements, has been retained and modernized to assist both the geochemical analyst and the economic geologist needing to know the various minerals associated with a particular element. Each elements world production totals and uses are included. Other revisions to the text have also been made. For over a century this book has served as an important compendium of key information about minerals and as a widely adopted teaching text. Colin Gribble was joint author of "A Practical Introduction to Optical Mineralogy" (with Allan Hall) and "Geology for Civil Engineers" (with Adam McLean). He is also active as a consultant geologist and a researcher in the engineering/geochemical field.
Part 1 The chemistry of minerals: states of matter; elements, compounds and mixtures; atoms and molecules; atomic number, valency and atomic weight; atomic bonding; ion size and ionic radii; ionic potential and behaviour of ions in magma; periodic classification of the elements; oxides, acids and bases, salts; oxidation and reduction; the electrochemical series of metals; chemical analysis. Part 2 Physical properties of minerals: characters dependent on light; taste, odour and feel; state of aggregation; specific gravity; characters dependent upon heat; characters dependent upon magnetism, electricity and radioactivity. Part 3 The elements of crystallography: the internal structure of minerals; the nature of the crystalline state; description of crystals; crystal systems; crystal drawings; simple uses of crystal stereograms. Part 4 The optical properties of minerals: the nature of light; reflection; refraction; the petrological microscope; isotropic and anisotropic substances; isotropic minerals; uniaxial minerals; biaxial minerals; pleochroism; thin sections of rocks and minerals; the systematic description of minerals under the petrological microscope; the microscopic investigation of ore minerals; microchemical tests; x-ray diffraction studies of minerals. Part 5 The occurrence of minerals: classification of rocks; igneous rocks; sedimentary rocks; metamorphic rocks; mineral deposits; earth history. Part 6 The classification of minerals. Part 7 Economic grouping of minerals according to elements: lithium, sodium and potassium; copper, silver and gold; calcium, strontium, barium and radium; beryllium, magnesium, zinc, cadmium and mercury; boron and aluminium (gallium, indium); titanium, zirconium, cerium and rare earth elements, thorium; carbon, silicon, tin and lead; vanadium, niobium and tantalum; nitrogen, phosphorus, arsenic, antinomy and bismuth; chromium, molybdenum, tungsten and uranium; sulphur, selenium and tellerium; manganese and rhenium; fluorine, chlorine, bromine and iodine; iron, cobalt and nickel; ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium and platinum. Part 8 The non-silicate minerals: native elements; halides; sulphides; oxides; carbonates; nitrates; borates; sulphates; chromates; phosphates, arsenates and vanadates; molybdates and tungstates. Part 9 The silicate minerals: crystal chemistry of silicate minerals; nesosilicates; sorosilicates; cyclosilicates; inosilicates (chain silicates); phyllosilicates (sheet silicates); tektosilicates (framework silicates). Appendix a - analysis by the blowpipe: the blowpipe; the two types of flame; supports; fluxes; tube tests; reactions; tables of blowpipe analyses. Appendix b - hydrocarbons: coals; bitumens.